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The Importance of Being Me (Part 4)
Jennifer Levine
9-12    10 hours



Lesson created on 8/17/1999 3:30:27 PM EST.
Last modified 11/22/1999 3:05:47 PM EST.


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Abstract  (help)


This is the final lesson in the unit "The Importance of Being Me," which is designed to be used within the first few days or weeks of the school semester/year. Furthermore, I intended this lesson to be used predominantly with ninth graders because each aspect of the unit introduces them to techniques I will use with them throughout the remainder of the school year to read, interpret, discuss, and write about literature. During this unit, students read a short story by a Mexican woman, a poem by a Chinese woman, and an anonymous quote by an African American, all on the importance of names to the writers and/or characters and to their cultures. In addition to reading the aforementioned selections, students will employ a variety of strategies to interpret the texts, while also bringing in their own personal experiences. At this final stage, students have interviewed family members about the origins and meanings of their names, as well as conducted internet research on these topics. As the culminating task, students will create a Hyperstudio presentation to reveal not only the history behind their names, but also how they identify themselves.

National Standards  (help)


English Language Arts Standard #4: Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes. #5: Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes. #7: Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and non-print texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience. #8: Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.

Pre-requisite Skills  (help)


Students must have basic computer skills. They should be able to follow directions. Students should read independently at a junior high school level or beyond.

Teacher Information  (help)


Teacher reminds students of the previous lessons and introduces the culminating task-a Hyperstudio presentation on the origin/meaning of their names and how they identify themselves. Teacher must use LCD projector to demonstrate how to create a Hyperstudio presentation-i.e. how to create stacks, add text/sound/graphics, use buttons, change background color, rearrange cards/stacks, etc. Teacher may also need to demonstrate the use of a digital camera and/or scanner, as well as how to save/retrieve/insert these files into their Hyperstudio presentations. Teacher should constantly circulate around the room once students begin working independently on their projects.

Assessment  (help)


1) Hyperstudio presentation criteria-There must be at least one card covering each of the following: a) student's full given name; b) official origin of name; c) meaning of name; d) who in student's family chose his/her name; e) why he/she chose that name; f) student's nicknames, including who gave them, why they were given, and how student feels about them; g) other names/labels by which student identifies him/herself; h) how student sees him/herself; h) works cited listing URLs/books used as well as interviews conducted; i) title or introductory page. The presentation cards may be decorated in any manner appropriate to the assignment. There must be an oral component, either recorded into the stack or otherwise. The student must take this portion seriously, speaking clearly and professionally, addressing the appropriate audience. 2) Reflection criteria-Students must write a written reflection after their project is completed and presented to the class. This reflection must address the following issues: 1) The part I liked best and why; 2) The part I liked least and why; 3) What I would do differently next time and why; 4) What I learned by doing this project. All questions must be addressed in * page paragraphs or longer with complete sentences and proper punctuation.

Student Activity  (help)


1.) Teacher demonstrates Hyperstudio capabilities using LCD projector-i.e. how to create stacks, add text/sound/graphics, use buttons, change background color, rearrange cards/stacks, etc. Teacher may also need to demonstrate the use of a digital camera and/or scanner, as well as how to save/retrieve/insert these files into their Hyperstudio presentations. Teacher should constantly circulate around the room once students begin working independently on their projects. 2.) Students organize their previous assignments before beginning to create their Hyperstudio presentation. Students must get teacher approval of a written storyboard prior to beginning their stacks. 3.) Students create their Hyperstudio stacks. Teacher circulates and answers questions as they arise. Students must be sure to fulfill all of the criteria listed in the assessment section. 4.) Students write the rough draft of their reflections. These reflections should be typed on word processing programs, using the spell check, prior to submission. 5.) During student presentations, all students are required to be active listeners.

Technology Requirements/Integration  (help)


1) Networked computers with word processing, internet capabilities, and Hyperstudio presentation software. 2) LCD projector, printer, digital camera, and a scanner. Students previously took notes on their internet research using word processing programs. This information will now be retrieved and inserted into their Hyperstudio presentations. Students may also search for graphics on the internet to use in their presentations. Teacher uses LCD projector for demonstrations and students use it to present their Hyperstudio stacks.




Copyright 1997-2003
Career Connection to Teaching with Technology
USDOE Technology Innovation Challenge Grant
Marshall Ransom, Project Manager
All rights reserved.

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