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Pollution Resolution
Pamela Galus
    1 class period



Lesson created on 11/7/1999 7:28:41 AM EST.
Last modified 8/3/2000 7:56:08 PM EST.


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Abstract  (help)


1. Students used the internet to locate information and expand their understanding of each alternative energy source. 2. Students compiled thier research into a 250 word report that summarized the information they obtained. 3. Students worked in small groups to complete a list of the benefits and disadvantages to each energy source and to determine which source would be most practical for their homes and school. 4. Student shared their lists and a master list was created listing all the benefits and disadvantages of each source. Students discussed their findings, defining and defending their possitions as the class worked together to determine the best energy source for their area. Students summarized the information in a 150 word. 5. In this lesson, students will create an individual plan for reducing water and air pollution. In preparation for the activity, each student should bring in one computer printout that discusses a water or air pollutant that results from individual or home use.

National Standards  (help)


Scientists in different disciplines ask different questions, use different methods of investigation, and accept different types of evidence to support their explanations. Many scientific investigations require the contributions of individuals from different disciplines, including engineering. New disciplines of science, such as geophysics and biochemistry often emerge at the interface of two older disciplines. Science often advances with the introduction of new technologies. Solving technological problems often results in new scientific knowledge. New technologies often extend the current levels of scientific understanding and introduce new areas of research. Creativity, imagination, and a good knowledge base are all required in the work of science and engineering. Science and technology are pursued for different purposes. Scientific inquiry is driven by the desire to understand the natural world, and technological design is driven by the need to meet human needs and solve human problems. Technology, by its nature, has a more direct effect on society than science because its purpose is to solve human problems, help humans adapt, and fulfill human aspirations. Technological solutions may create new problems. Science, by its nature, answers questions that may or may not directly influence humans. Sometimes scientific advances challenge people's beliefs and practical explanations concerning various aspects of the world.

Pre-requisite Skills  (help)


Students should understand the interactions among the solid earth, the oceans, the atmosphere and life on earth. Students should have the ability to access Internet independantly. Students should also have some instruction on the basics of group work.

Teacher Information  (help)


Students should be assigned to locate and bring to class one computer printout from the Internet that discusses a source of air or water pollution that comes from home and individual uses. The class should discuss the source of water and air pollutants. Students will be placed in teams to discuss and then orally present suggestions on how group members think that an individual can best change habits to assist with the resolution of water and air quality problems.

Assessment  (help)


An informal assessment should be used to determine that all students are participating in the discussion. The oral segment should be divided so that each student has an opportunity to present part of the plan devised during the group discussion. After the oral presentation is complete, the instructor and the class should ask questions and discuss feasibility. Each Group should be given about five minutes to complete the oral segment and share the information they brought to class. Oral reports should contain the following components: Scope of the problem Why it is necessary for each individual to become involved in resolution of pollution problems. At least 5 sources of polllutants from home use that contributes to water or air pollution. Each group member should suggest at least one way they intend to reduce water or air pollution by changing habits at home. Feasibility and ability to respond to audience queries.

Student Activity  (help)


Students should participate in a discussion of the source of water and air pollutants. Each student should show the group the information located on the Internet and explain the pollution source located and how it could be prevented. Students will work in teams(3-4 students) to discuss and then orally present an individual plan for reducing water or air pollution; the class should be divided by interest among water and air pollution sources. Each student member should state that they are willing to implement one or more of the suggestions; which could be as simple as reading the label on fertilizers and pesticides prior to application. Oral reports should contain the following components: Scope of the problem Why it is necessary for each individual to become involved in resolution of pollution problems. At least 5 sources of polllutants from home use that contributes to water or air pollution. Each group member should suggest at least one way they intend to reduce water or air pollution by changing habits at home. Ask for questions from the class

Technology Requirements/Integration  (help)


Students must have access to computers connected to the Internet. If a write up is required, English teachers may be able to count it as a theme and correct writing areas allowing the science teacher to check for scientific accuracy. There are many art pieces that depict or discuss water and landscapes containing shoreline. Social Studies could look at the change in oppinion over time in the philosophy of waste disposal. Biology has many connections, particularly as the industrial revolution occurred resulting in changes in populations. Geography could look at the major areas where pollution is a problem. Additionally, pollution generated often strains international relations. States have been arguing over water rights because upstream users may be taking large amounts from rivers which reduces flows or dumping waste.




Copyright 1997-2003
Career Connection to Teaching with Technology
USDOE Technology Innovation Challenge Grant
Marshall Ransom, Project Manager
All rights reserved.

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